Julia Forrest

USA | Photography,  koronia’s house

Julia Forrest, always working on analogue photography, traveled internally on the island following residency participants to their workplaces. There she set up and photographed small scenes with the human subject at their center, looking for ways to equate or balance their presence with the natural landscape. The time-consuming process of displaying and editing the photographic film with integral randomness is still ongoing and the result is therefore mysterious and uncertain.

Biography

Julia Forrest is a Brooklyn based artist. She works strictly in film and prints in a darkroom she built within her apartment. Her own art has always been her top priority in life and in this digital world, she will continue to work with old processing. Anything can simply be done in photoshop, she prefers to take the camera, a tool of showing reality, and experiment with what she can do in front of the lens.

Julia is currently working as a teaching artist at the Brooklyn Museum and USDAN Art Center. As an instructor, she thinks it is important to understand that a person can constantly stretch and push the boundaries of their ideas with whatever medium of art s/he chooses. Her goal is for her audience to not only enjoy learning about photography, but to see the world in an entirely new way and continue to develop a future interest in the arts.

I pose nymph like women in the landscape. By using mirrors, reflections, and forced perspective, I create an illusion in front of the lens. Although they appear delicate and fragile, it is obvious they possess a mysterious power to move the landscape at will. They change shape and scale, picking up parts of the landscape or completely transforming it.
During the residency, I will be surrounded by the most ideal environment to perfect my series. This will be a brand new landscape to experience, and I can’t wait to jump in the middle and capture it. It will be like stepping back in time, as if I am becoming one of the first historical photographers set out to explore the unknown world and re-discover one of the most basic elements: fire. I feel my work will truly develop into the surreal environment I am striving to preserve. I will have the opportunity to walk out my door and spend all day finding locations, posing models, and shooting. I will focus on using the element of fire as a symbol for the dawn of time, the creation of the natural world, and control of this element to transform it. In the studio, I will retire to my own compact, self-built darkroom to print photographs on high quality fiber-based paper. I know that with Kinono I will no longer feel limited. I am excited to be given the chance to compose photographs that I could not compose anywhere else.